Make your own free website on Tripod.com
TINTIN LANGUAGES
AFRIKAANS
ALGUERES
ALSATIAN
ARABIC
ASTURIAN
BASQUE
BERNESE
BENGALI
BRETON
BULGARE
CAMBODIAN
CATALAN
CHINESE
CORSICAN
CZECH
DANISH
DUTCH
ENGLISH
ESPERANTO
FARSI
FAEROESE
FINNISH
FRENCH
FRIESIAN
GALICIAN
GALLO
GAUMIAN
GERMAN
GREEK
HEBREW
HUNGARIAN
ICELANDIC
INDONESIAN
ITALIAN
JAPANESE
KOREAN
LATIN
LUXEMBOURGER
MALAYALAM
NORWEGIAN
OCCITAN
PICARDY
POLISH
PORTUGUESE
ROMANSCH
RUSSIAN
SERBO-CROAT
SINHALESE
SLOVAK
SPANISH
SWEDISH
TAHITIAN
TAIWANESE
THAI
TIBETAN
TURKISH
VIETNAMESE
WELSH
TOTAL 60 VERIFIED LANGUAGES
RUMOURS 
MIRANDES

MONEGASCO

PROVENÇAL
RUANDES
MONEGASCO
LINKS CRAB MENÚ CASTAFIORE MENU INDEX

 

WANTED¡¡

LATIN
Family: Indo-European
Subgroup: Italic
Branch:  

Tintin

Milou

Capitaine Haddock

Tryphon Tournesol

Dupont

Dupond

Tintinus

Milule

-
-

Clodius

Claudius

 

 

Latin was brought to the Italian peninsula by a wave of immigrants from the north about 1000 B.C. Over the centuries the city of Rome rose to a position of prominence and the Latin of Rome became the literary standard of the newly-emerging Roman Empire. Side by side with classical Latin a spoken vernacular developed, which was carried by the Roman army throughout the empire. It completely displaced the pre-Roman tongues of Italy, Gaul, and Spain and was readily accepted by the barbarians who partitioned the Roman Empire in the 5th century A.D. Further divisions led to the eventual emergence of the modern Romance languages—Italian, French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Rumanian.

The Latin, or Roman, alphabet was created in the 7th century B.C. It was based on the Etruscan alphabet, which in turn was derived from the Greek. Of the original twenty-six Etruscan letters the Romans adopted twenty-one. The original Latin alphabet was A, B, C (which stood for both g and k), D, E, F, I (the Greek zeta), H, I (which stood for both i and j), K, L, M, N, 0, P, Q, R (though for a long time this was written P), S, T, V (which stood for u, v, and w), and X. Later the Greek zeta (I) was dropped and a new letter G was placed in its position. After the conquest of Greece in the first century B.C. the letters Y and Z were adopted from the contemporary Greek alphabet and placed at the end. Thus the new Latin alphabet contained twenty-three letters. It was not until the Middle Ages that the letter J (to distinguish it from I) and the letters U and W (to distinguish them from V) were added.

Latin lacks somewhat the variety and flexibility of Greek, perhaps reflecting the practical nature of the Roman people, who were more concerned with government and empire than with speculative thought and poetic imagery. Yet in the hands of the great masters of the classical period it was the vehicle for a body of literature and poetry that can bear comparison with any in the world.

 

 

 

PUBLISHER

ELI / Casterman  

 

 

ONLINE SHOPING 

   

 

LINKS   

 

 

 

     

 

 

I'VE GOT THIS ONE   ! WANTED!