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TINTIN LANGUAGES
AFRIKAANS
ALGUERES
ALSATIAN
ARABIC
ASTURIAN
BASQUE
BERNESE
BENGALI
BRETON
BULGARE
CAMBODIAN
CATALAN
CHINESE
CORSICAN
CZECH
DANISH
DUTCH
ENGLISH
ESPERANTO
FARSI
FAEROESE
FINNISH
FRENCH
FRIESIAN
GALICIAN
GALLO
GAUMIAN
GERMAN
GREEK
HEBREW
HUNGARIAN
ICELANDIC
INDONESIAN
ITALIAN
JAPANESE
KOREAN
LATIN
LUXEMBOURGER
MALAYALAM
NORWEGIAN
OCCITAN
PICARDY
POLISH
PORTUGUESE
ROMANSCH
RUSSIAN
SERBO-CROAT
SINHALESE
SLOVAK
SPANISH
SWEDISH
TAHITIAN
TAIWANESE
THAI
TIBETAN
TURKISH
VIETNAMESE
WELSH
TOTAL 60 VERIFIED LANGUAGES
RUMOURS 
MIRANDES

MONEGASCO

PROVENÇAL
RUANDES
MONEGASCO
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PORTUGUESE
Family: Indo-European
Subgroup: Romance
Branch:  

Tintin

Milou

Capitaine Haddock

Tryphon Tournesol

Dupont

Dupond

Tintim

Milu

Capitão Haddock

Trifolio Girassol

Dupont

Dupond

 

 

Portuguese is the national language of both Portugal and Brazil. With about 10 million speakers in the former and some 160 million in the latter, coupled with speakers in Portuguese colonies in Africa, in the Atlantic, and in Asia, its total number of speakers is over 170 million. in northwesternmost Spain about 3 million people speak a dialect of Portuguese known as Galician.

Portuguese is a Romance language, closely related to, and yet distinctly different from, Spanish. It is softer and less emphatic than Spanish, with a greater variety of vowel sounds, and contains a number of nasal sounds that are completely unknown in Spanish. Words beginning with h in Spanish frequently begin with f in Portuguese (e.g., hijo/filho—son), while words ending in -ción in Spanish generally end in -ção in Portuguese (nación/naऑã—nation). There are a number of words from Arabic in both languages (algodón/algodão—cotton) plus a few peculiar to Portuguese (alfaiate—tailor). Many words are identical in the two languages (mesa—table, flor—flower, lago—lake), but others are completely different (perro/cão—dog, gracias/obrigado—thank you).

The Portuguese of Brazil is slower and more measured than that of Portugal, but the Brazilians and Portuguese communicate with each other without the slightest difficulty. As in British and American English there are occasional differences in vocabulary. The word for "boy" is rapaz in Portugal but moço in Brazil; "girl" is rapariga in Portugal and moça in Brazil. Some Brazilian words are of Indian origin (e.g., abacaxi—pineapp{e).

 

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EDITORA RECORD (BRASIL)

 

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