Make your own free website on Tripod.com
TINTIN LANGUAGES
AFRIKAANS
ALGUERES
ALSATIAN
ARABIC
ASTURIAN
BASQUE
BERNESE
BENGALI
BRETON
BULGARE
CAMBODIAN
CATALAN
CHINESE
CORSICAN
CZECH
DANISH
DUTCH
ENGLISH
ESPERANTO
FARSI
FAEROESE
FINNISH
FRENCH
FRIESIAN
GALICIAN
GALLO
GAUMIAN
GERMAN
GREEK
HEBREW
HUNGARIAN
ICELANDIC
INDONESIAN
ITALIAN
JAPANESE
KOREAN
LATIN
LUXEMBOURGER
MALAYALAM
NORWEGIAN
OCCITAN
PICARDY
POLISH
PORTUGUESE
ROMANSCH
RUSSIAN
SERBO-CROAT
SINHALESE
SLOVAK
SPANISH
SWEDISH
TAHITIAN
TAIWANESE
THAI
TIBETAN
TURKISH
VIETNAMESE
WELSH
TOTAL 60 VERIFIED LANGUAGES
RUMOURS 
MIRANDES

MONEGASCO

PROVENÇAL
RUANDES
MONEGASCO
LINKS CRAB MENÚ CASTAFIORE MENU INDEX

 

MALAY
Family:Malayo-Polinesian

 (Austronesian)

Subgroup:  Indonesian
Branch:  

Tintin

Milou

Capitaine Haddock

Tryphon Tournesol

Dupont

Dupond

Tintin

Snowi

Kepten Haddock

Cuthbert Calculus

Thomson

Thompson

 

 

Malay is spoken principally in Malaysia and, to a lesser extent, in neighboring Thailand and Singapore. Before 1945 its speakers extended through much of the Indonesian archipelago, but with the establishment of the Republic of Indonesia the Malay of that country was designated Indonesian. In Malaysia it is the mother tongue of about 10 million people, or about half the total population. Speakers in Thailand number one million, in Singapore 250,000.

Malay is a member of the MaIay-Polynesian family of languages Beginning in the 14th century, with the conversion of many Malays to Islam, a variation of the Arabic script known as Jawi was used for writing. In the 19th century the British constructed a Roman-based alphabet that is in general use today. It differs slightly from the one used in Indonesia, which was developed by the Dutch, but the resulting variations in spelling are in fact the only difference between the two languages. A few examples of these differences may be found in the article on Indonesian. Grammatical concepts in Malay differ radically from those in Western languages. Prefixes and suffixes as we use them are virtually absent, their functions being assumed by additional words. The plural of a noun is most commonly indicated by simply saying it twice, as in rumah-rumah in the passage below, which means "houses." After numbers, however, the noun reverts to the singular and an additional word is added, similar to the English construction "seven head of cattle." Malay has many of these "numerical coefficients"—one for people (orang—man), one for animals (ekor—tail), and others for flowers, jewels, threads, and even fishing nets. "Two cats" in Malay is dua ekor kuching ("two-tail-cat"), while "two children" is budak dua orang ("child-two-man").

Malay contains many words of Sanskrit and Arabic origin. English words of Malay origin include orangutan, gingham, sarong, bamboo, rattan, kapok, paddy, and amok.

 

PUBLISHER 

SHARIKAT UNITED Pulau Pinag

DELTA

 

MALAY

INDONESIAN

FRENCH

Pulau Hitam

Rahasia pulau hitam

L'Île noire

Rahsia Unikorn

Rahasia kapal Unicorn

Le Secret de la Licorne

Harta Karun Red Rackham

Harta Karun  Rackham Merah

Le Tresor de Rackham Le Rouge

Penerbangan 714

Penerbangan 714

Vol 714 pour Sydney

Korban-Korban Matahari

Tawanan dewa matahari

Le Temple du soleil

Tujuh biji bola kaca

Tujuh bola ajaib

Les 7 boules de cristal

Ketam dengan sepit emas (WANTED)

Kepiting bercapit emas

Le Crabe aux pinces d'or

Destinasi bulan

Ekspedisi di bulan

Objetif Lune

Pengembara di bulan

Penjelajahan di bulan

On a marché sur la Lune

 

LINKS   

 

 

 

   

      

 

I'VE GOT THIS ONE   ! WANTED!