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TINTIN LANGUAGES
AFRIKAANS
ALGUERES
ALSATIAN
ARABIC
ASTURIAN
BASQUE
BERNESE
BENGALI
BRETON
BULGARE
CAMBODIAN
CATALAN
CHINESE
CORSICAN
CZECH
DANISH
DUTCH
ENGLISH
ESPERANTO
FARSI
FAEROESE
FINNISH
FRENCH
FRIESIAN
GALICIAN
GALLO
GAUMIAN
GERMAN
GREEK
HEBREW
HUNGARIAN
ICELANDIC
INDONESIAN
ITALIAN
JAPANESE
KOREAN
LATIN
LUXEMBOURGER
MALAYALAM
NORWEGIAN
OCCITAN
PICARDY
POLISH
PORTUGUESE
ROMANSCH
RUSSIAN
SERBO-CROAT
SINHALESE
SLOVAK
SPANISH
SWEDISH
TAHITIAN
TAIWANESE
THAI
TIBETAN
TURKISH
VIETNAMESE
WELSH
TOTAL 60 VERIFIED LANGUAGES
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GERMAN
Family: Indo-European
Subgroup: Germanic
Branch: Western

Tintin

Milou

Capitaine Haddock

Tryphon Tournesol

Dupont

Dupond

Tim

Struppi

Kapitän Haddock

Balduin Bienlein

Schulze

Schultze

 

 

German is one of the main cultural languages of the Western world, spoken by approximately 100 million people. It is the national language of both Germany and Austria. and is one of the four official languages of Switzerland. Additionally it is spoken in eastern France, in the region formerly known as Alsace-Lorraine, in northern Italy in the region of Alto Adige, and also in eastern Belgium, Luxembourg, and the principality of Liechtenstein. There are about one and a half million speakers of German in the United States, 500,000 in Canada and sizable colonies as well in South America and such far-flung countries as Namibia and Kazakhstan.

Traditionally German was written in a Gothic style known as Fraktur, which dates from the 14th century. In the period following World War II, however, Fraktur was largely superseded by the Roman characters used throughout the rest of Western Europe. The Roman script contains only one additional letter, the ß or double s, which is used only in the lower case.

Since English is a Germanic language, it is not surprising to find a high degree of similarity in the vocabulary of the two languages. Finger, Hand, Butter, Ring, Name, warm, and blind are German words mean-mg exactly what they do in English. Other words that are very similar to their English counterparts are Vater (father), Mutter (mother), Freund (friend), Gott (God), Licht (light), Wasser (water), Feuer (fire), Silber (silver), Brot (bread), Milch (milk), Fisch (fish), Apfel (apple), Buch (book), gut (good), alt (old), kalt (cold), and blau (blue). More recent German borrowings in English are schnitzel, sauerkraut, pumpernickel, kindergarten, dachshund, poodle, yodel, lager, ersatz, edelweiss, meerschaum, wanderlust, hinterland, and blitzkrieg. The words frankfurter and hamburger come from the German cities of Frankfurt and Hamburg respectively.

 

PUBLISHER

Carlsen Comics

 

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       1st EDITION 1953

 

 

 

 

 

I'VE GOT THIS ONE   ! WANTED!